Hand-Made Antique Lace, a Gift from the Past

A few months ago, I got an email from an old friend about a custom order request for EmaBee. She and I played soccer and survived the treacherous seas of middle school together here in Annapolis. So, when I got the email from her saying she was getting married and wanted me to make a bracelet for her wedding day, I was ecstatic!

Especially when she said that she wanted me to use antique lace that had been hand-made by her maternal great-grandmother. That made the project even more special. I spoke to my friend’s mother when I went to pick up the piece of lace, and she told me how she remembered her grand-mother (my friends great-grandmother) whizzing away making the lace. When the younger women in the family would ask her how she did it, the moment she slowed down to show them, she couldn’t do it – it had become so innate, so much a part of her, she actually couldn’t remember how to do it; she just did it.

Working with this old antique lace was a treasure; analyzing the tiny stitches you can barely see, the ornate pattern. I found myself trying to envision this woman putting so much time and talent into something that her great-granddaughter would end up wearing around her wrist on her wedding day.

The lace allowed for a connection between generations of women in her family. She is able to connect to generations women in her family through a bracelet made out of this hand-made lace on her special day. It is an honor to be able to help make this possible.

This is one of the best kinds of art – connecting the past and the present, and preserving family history…

the clasp is a simple tied bow on the inside of the wrist

the clasp is a simple tied bow on the inside of the wrist

the bracelet sits on the wrist like a frilly cuff

the bracelet sits on the wrist like a frilly cuff

the piece of cloth and lace - notice the incredibly tiny stitches to fasten the lace the the fabric, and to make the lace itself....

the piece of cloth and lace – notice the incredibly tiny stitches to fasten the lace the the fabric, and to make the lace itself….

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